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Attorney Gatewood Galbraith, 1978

Posted on January 23, 2016 | in Uncategorized | by
Kentucky attorney Gatewood Galbraith, April 4, 1978. Galbraith, an iconic Kentucky political figure and perennial candidate who won many hearts but never enough votes, died in 2012, just two months after running his fifth campaign for governor. Although widely popular for his wit and unconventional stances, Galbraith's political life was led outside of Democratic and Republican party machinery, which meant he nearly always trailed in fund-raising totals. In addition to his five unsuccessful runs for governor, Galbraith also made failed bids for agriculture commissioner, U.S. representative and attorney general. Between campaigns, Galbraith worked independently as a criminal defense attorney, and he often quipped that "losing statewide elections doesn't pay worth a damn." Known universally by his first name, Gatewood was a recognizable figure around Lexington and the state, partly because of his imposing height and signature fedora, and partly because of his outspoken proposals to legalize marijuana and outlaw mountaintop-removal coal mining. Jan. 23, 2016 would have been his 69th birthday. Photo by Frank Anderson | Staff

Kentucky attorney Gatewood Galbraith on April 4, 1978, a year after he graduated from University Kentucky law school. Galbraith, an iconic Kentucky political figure and perennial candidate who won many hearts but never enough votes, died in 2012, just two months after running his fifth campaign for governor. Although widely popular for his wit and unconventional stances, Galbraith’s political life was led outside of Democratic and Republican party machinery, which meant he nearly always trailed in fundraising totals. In addition to his five unsuccessful runs for governor, Galbraith made failed bids for agriculture commissioner, U.S. representative and attorney general. Between campaigns, Galbraith worked independently as a criminal defense attorney, and he often quipped that “losing statewide elections doesn’t pay worth a damn.” Known universally by his first name, Gatewood was a recognizable figure in Lexington and statewide, partly because of his imposing height and signature fedora, and partly because of his outspoken proposals to legalize marijuana and outlaw mountaintop-removal coal mining. Jan. 23, 2016, would have been his 69th birthday. Photo by Frank Anderson | Staff

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